12 Differences Between Agency and In-House Recruiting

May 18, 2016

Twelve months ago I made the transition from agency to in-house recruitment, and I had a whole bunch of preconceived ideas about what life would be like on ‘the other side.’ Some right, some wrong and some that I hadn’t even considered.

Whether you’re considering a move to internal recruitment or just want to get a better idea of life as an internal recruiter, hopefully this list of differences will help. 

1. You become close (real close) with hiring managers

  • in house vs agency recruiting

2. You don’t earn commission anymore...

  • in house vs agency recruiting

3. ...But there’s no more business development

  • in house vs agency recruiting

4. But there is HR, legal, hiring process and strategy, budgeting, marketing, reporting, planning etc.

  • in house vs agency recruiting

5. You are no longer hiring for multiple companies. It’s you and the company building a future together.

  • in house vs agency recruiting

6. You have to fill all positions. You cannot hide.

  • in house vs agency recruiting

7. The phone times KPI doesn’t exist. Because it’s not the 80’s. And hiring managers don’t care how long you’ve been on the phone.

  • in house vs agency recruiting

8. When a role is filled, you have a new colleague.

  • in house vs agency recruiting

9. You get to work as a team to achieve hiring goals.

  • agency vs in house recruiting

10. You have to reject applications. A lot of applications. So you may not always be popular.

  • in house vs agency recruiting

11. As always though, whether it’s a formal interview or a phone screen, watch out for candidate bullsh*t.

  • in house vs agency recruiting

12. And in-house recruitment is actually hard work. Who knew!?

  • in house vs agency recruiting

After spending many years in agency recruitment,  Joe Burridge  is now an in-house Tech Recruiter for  Hudl  based in London, UK. He is also the creator of  Joe Blogs  and was identified as a  LinkedIn Power Profile  in Human Resources for 2015.

*Featured image from the Seat Otter Foundation Trust

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