Illustration of a doctor in an exam room working on a computer

Why this matters:

Biomedical engineers design solutions that improve outcomes for patients. To meet this objective, they need to mitigate potential risks and abide by regional legislation meant to keep people safe. Failing to comply with these laws can result in fines or legal action against your organization, so it’s important the candidate is already well-versed in them.

What to listen for:

  • Knowledge of biotechnology and medical device marketing regulations or guidelines in your region
  • Commitment to following general industry best practices for patient safety and confidentiality    
  • Understanding of the consequences of failing to comply with legislation

Why this matters:

Biomedical engineering encompasses a number of subspecialities. While the candidate may not work heavily in imaging, this question can gauge their technical understanding of core concepts, particularly on the medical side. What’s more, imaging technologies are relevant to many facets of the field, making medical imaging an important, versatile skill.

What to listen for:

  • Knowledge of specific technologies, like magnetic resonance imaging, electron microscopy, or fluoroscopy
  • Familiarity with potential applications for these technologies
  • Prior experience working with or improving upon these technologies, like designing software and circuits, is a plus

Why this matters:

Biomedical engineers often use computer-aided design (CAD) software to create new devices or therapies. If the candidate already has experience with the software your organization uses, it can reduce their learning curve when starting out. That said, this isn’t a requirement. Simply knowing one software well can make learning other programs much easier.

What to listen for:

  • Experience using CAD software like SolidWorks, AutoCAD, and Abaqus FEA
  • A willingness to learn new programs, which indicates that the candidate values growth and learning
  • Experience with the software your team uses is a plus, but not a requirement

Why this matters:

Biomedical engineers often have to troubleshoot software, devices, and technologies that aren’t performing properly. The candidate’s response to this question can provide insight into how they confront challenges and approach problem solving. Ideally, they’ll persevere in the face of obstacles, exercising both creativity and critical thinking.

What to listen for:

  • Resilience when facing challenges and determination to complete the task at hand 
  • Experience drawing on technical and cross-discipline knowledge to devise out-of-the-box solutions
  • Willingness to ask for help when needed

 

Why this matters:

The process of turning a mere idea into a working solution can be difficult, but it’s a key part of any biomedical engineer’s job. Setbacks are part of the scientific journey, and engineers can’t be easily discouraged. Stellar candidates will embrace an iterative development process and stay motivated when faced with technical, regulatory, or administrative obstacles.

 

What to listen for:

  • Commitment to seeing an idea through to completion
  • Adaptability and a willingness to pivot when initial plans don’t work out
  • Comfort with an iterative, methodical approach to development and problem solving

Why this matters:

Biomedical engineers frequently work with others to devise, implement, and repair solutions. Whether they’re training a clinician on how to use a device they created or collaborating with researchers to create new therapies, they need to be capable of working well with others. Ideally, the candidate will be practiced at learning from and teaching others on the job.

What to listen for:

  • Patience when working with people who may not have comparable technical knowledge
  • Ability to clearly communicate and explain complex topics
  • Strong interpersonal skills and indication that the candidate is a team player

Why this matters:

Biomedical engineers work on cutting-edge projects at the intersection of human and mechanical science. The innovative nature of their work means they can encounter ethical dilemmas where there isn’t a clear right or wrong answer. Ideally, the candidate will have thought carefully about the implications of their work and always exercise caution in new situations.

What to listen for:

  • A moral compass that will help the candidate make sound decisions 
  • Understanding of the business implications that can arise as a result of unethical practices
  • Strong analytical and critical thinking skills

Why this matters:

Within the field of biomedical engineering, there are a variety of subspecialities, and most professionals will have a specific area of interest. The candidate’s answer to this question can give you insight into what type of work they’ll be most drawn to at your organization, and whether you can provide opportunities that align with their interests.

What to listen for:

  • Interest in a specialty like bioinstrumentation, genetics, or rehabilitation
  • Strong communication skills and the ability to explain complicated topics in a clear manner
  • Prior experience within their preferred specialty, which indicates a clear interest

Why this matters:

While working on projects, biomedical engineers often have to take budgets, deadlines, and other common business constraints into consideration. The candidate should be comfortable assessing the work required to complete a project and pacing themselves appropriately. It’s also a plus if the candidate has experience managing a team to meet specific goals.

What to listen for:

  • Ability to gauge project scope and manage supervisors’ and stakeholders’ expectations
  • Experience making iterative plans for design and development  
  • History of using specific project management tools or methods to keep themselves on track
chatting over desk with laptops and coffee

Contact a sales specialist

By submitting this form, you agree that we may use the data you provide to contact you with information related to your request/submission and LinkedIn's products and services. If you are a LinkedIn member, you can control the messages you receive from LinkedIn in your settings. If you are a guest, you can unsubscribe from LinkedIn marketing emails at any time by clicking the unsubscribe link in the email. Your data will be used subject to LinkedIn's Privacy Policy.