Smiling man drives car
Graphic that shows three different types of interview questions you should be asking.

Use these questions to identify a candidate’s technical knowledge and abilities

Use these questions to determine how a candidate handled situations in the past

Use these questions to assess a candidate’s personal traits and cognitive skills

Why this matters

Whether they’ve been driving professionally for years or just got their license, your next driver should know what to do if they face inclement weather while on the road. An understanding of best practices, combined with a responsible attitude, can help drivers protect themselves and other road users, no matter the weather.

What to listen for

  • A keen awareness of the danger bad weather can pose
  • References to safe driving practices like reducing speed, increasing following distance, and using low beams and fog lights
  • Ideally, candidates will have experience driving in all common weather conditions

Why this matters

Drivers will often have to travel through areas they’re not familiar with. If you’re hiring a driver primarily for local deliveries, knowledge of the local area is highly valuable. But ideally, all candidates will be equipped to use maps and GPS technology to quickly get back on track if they lose their way.

What to listen for

  • Evidence that the candidate is comfortable reading a map, using a GPS, and asking for directions if needed
  • A great answer will mention pulling over before looking up directions to avoid distraction
  • References to knowing the local area or common routes well are a plus

Why this matters

No matter how careful a driver is, factors beyond their control—like bad weather and the actions of other road users—can sometimes result in them getting into accidents. If something goes wrong on the road, you need to know that your driver understands the appropriate steps to take, especially in emergency situations where time may be of the essence.

What to listen for

  • Candidates should discuss the steps they’d take in the event of both minor and major accidents
  • References to following the company’s accident protocol
  • A willingness to call emergency services if needed

Why this matters

Your next driver will likely have to follow a strict schedule, but since traffic and weather can be unpredictable, delays will happen from time to time. In these instances, it’s important for your driver to act responsibly and with professionalism, especially if they need to communicate with customers. Ideally, they’ll take steps to minimize delays—but that shouldn’t include dangerous or illegal road behavior.

What to listen for

  • Signs that the candidate would never speed or act in other irresponsible ways to try and make up for delays
  • Mentions of following certain procedures, like pulling over and notifying the customer or their supervisor of the delay in good time

Why this matters

Professional drivers often have to drive for long stretches at a time. While some countries enforce a limit on the number of hours they’re allowed to be on the road each day, drivers also need to regulate their own activity to ensure they never fall asleep at the wheel or become distracted, potentially putting lives at risk.

What to listen for

  • Evidence that the candidate understands the risks of driving while tired or distracted
  • A strong answer will reference tactics like taking breaks when needed and using hands-free tech to avoid looking away from the road

Why this matters

Since many drivers have to interact directly with customers, they must be prepared to handle the occasional angry or upset person. Late deliveries and similar grievances might lead a customer to take their frustrations out on the driver, so the ability to maintain a professional demeanor and act appropriately in heated situations is critical.

What to listen for

  • References to tactics the candidate uses to deescalate heated situations, like speaking in a calm voice and offering potential solutions to the angry person’s problem
  • Mentions of the importance of representing their company well

Why this matters

The way a candidate answers this question can tell you both what they consider to be important qualities in drivers—and the qualities they pride themselves on. If they’ve been driving for a while, they should have a strong sense of what makes a good driver and seek to exemplify these qualities on the road.

What to listen for

  • A great answer may include qualities like being focused, patient, responsible, and highly aware of their surroundings
  • Candidates may also reference qualities specific to making deliveries, like being organized and a good communicator

Why this matters

This question can help you assess a candidate’s integrity and problem-solving skills. Failing to get a required signature—or worse, forging one—could get your company in trouble. But at the same time, you don’t want your driver to give up easily, forcing them to waste time making a second delivery attempt later.

What to listen for

  • A great answer may mention solutions like phoning the customer to find out where they are or finding another member of staff who can sign for the delivery
  • Evidence that the candidate always seeks to act in the best interests of both your company and its customers

Why this matters

This question can help you understand where your candidate finds their motivation. Driving might sound like an easy job, but being on the road for a long time can sometimes be tiring and tedious. If your candidate genuinely enjoys aspects of driving, like seeing different places and having time alone with their thoughts, they’re less likely to get bored, which could lead to distracted driving.

What to listen for

  • Signs that the candidate is passionate about driving
  • A thoughtful answer that shows the candidate understands both the enjoyable aspects of driving and the more challenging parts of the job