Woman wearing headphones in front of a screen with bookshelves behind her
1
  • DO use industry-standard or recognizable job titles — particularly ones found in the suggestion dropdown when creating a job post with LinkedIn Jobs
  • DO use clear, direct language that’s easy for candidates to scan
  • DON’T use gimmicky titles like “data ninja” or “social media rock star”
  • DON’T use traditionally gender-biased words like “sensitive,” “competitive,” or “assertive” to describe your ideal candidate
Recruiter working at desktop computer with multiple apps open
2
  • DO list specific tasks and projects that the candidate will work on or need to have prior experience with
  • DO consolidate responsibilities and qualifications into a maximum of four to six bullet points
  • DON’T list redundant or obvious qualifications like “must be able to prioritize work to meet deadlines”
  • DON’T try to make an exhaustive list of every possible task
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3
  • DO strike a balance between describing the job and enticing the candidate with benefits
  • DO list benefits in a separate “Perks” section to make them more visible
  • DON’T assume that the role alone, no matter how dynamic, is enough to attract the best candidates
  • DON’T list only generic benefits that fail to differentiate your company
Recruiter at desktop computer scrolling through a list of candidate profiles
4
  • DO include examples of successful projects the company has launched in the past
  • DO mention any meaningful and exciting projects the new hire will own
  • DON’T share only the day-to-day responsibilities of the role
  • DON’T regard upskilling as something an employee will do only during their downtime
Recruiter at desktop computer scrolling through a list of candidate profiles
5
  • DO emphasize workplace flexibility and remote working when possible
  • DO set realistic expectations about the amount of time the new hire may need to be in the office
  • DON’T make rigid statements about office attendance
  • DON’T wait until after the hire to clarify your company’s policy on workplace flexibility
Woman lying comfortably on a sofa and working on her laptop with a guitar behind her
6
  • DO add links to your best company sites, like your product pages or success stories
  • DO research what employees say about working at your company, and reflect those values in your posting
  • DON’T make your job posting simply a list of requirements
  • DON’T sound too casual — coming off as overly familiar gives the impression that you’re unprofessional
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Person sitting cross-legged at a home table and checking out a mobile device in hand
  • DO use bold text and bullet points to make the most important information easily scannable on small screens
  • DO post your open role on mobile-responsive job boards like LinkedIn Jobs
  • DON’T post to job boards with convoluted resume uploads — most people don’t keep their resume on their mobile devices
  • DON’T use symbols or emoji that may not appear on certain devices
Person sitting cross-legged at a home table and checking out a mobile device in hand